Join us in celebrating Jewish American & Asian American Pacific Islanders Heritage Months with a Community Conversation on May 19 at 4:00 PM ET. Register today.

Event Details

This event has passed. Visit our Events page for upcoming Community Conversations at america250.org/events.

Start Date/Time

Thursday, March 24, 2022 @ 2:00 PM

End Date

Thursday, March 24, 2022 @ 3:00 PM

Description

We all have places that matter to us, bring us together, and tell our stories. Join America250 for a Community Conversation, Building Community through Historic Preservation on March 24, 2022 from 2:00 – 3:00 PM ET.

“Historic preservation is a conversation with our past about our future. It provides us with opportunities to ask, “What is important in our history?” and “What parts of our past can we preserve for the future?” Through historic preservation, we look at history in different ways, ask different questions of the past, and learn new things about our history and ourselves. Historic preservation is an important way for us to transmit our understanding of the past to future generations.” – National Park Service 

During this conversation,  we will explore the importance of saving and interpreting buildings, neighborhoods, parks, and cultural heritage. We’ll talk about how history, preservation, legacy, and education work together to build communities and create a sense of place. There will be time for questions from the attendees.

The Community Conversation series is a place to connect, to share the stories, and histories that helped shape America.  It’s with your support that we can continue to have these conversations and explore themes that are important to our country. Learn more about America250’s mission and consider supporting with a donation to the Foundation.

We hope you will join us! 

Date: March 24, 2022
Time: 2:00 – 3:00 PM ET
Location: Online
Register: https://bit.ly/CCHistPrez

Meet the Panelists

Donna Graves
Public Historian and Urban Planner
Donna Graves is an independent historian and urban planner based in Berkeley, CA. She develops interdisciplinary public history projects that emphasize social equity and sense of place. Her involvement in projects that weave together local histories, preservation, art and community participation began with her tenure as executive director of The Power of Place. She has lectured widely and taught about inter-disciplinary approaches to developing public history projects and new ways of thinking about cultural heritage conservation. She is an Advisor to the National Park Service’s Asian American/Pacific Islander Theme Study and serves on the Board of Advisors for the National Trust for Historic Preservation. Recognitions for Graves’ work include the Vernacular Architecture Forum’s first Advocacy Award, the National Park Service’s Home Front Award, the California Governor’s Historic Preservation Award, and a Loeb Fellowship from Harvard’s Graduate School of Design.

Luis Hoyos
Professor of Architecture and Commissioner of the California State Historical Resources Commission
Luis Hoyos is a licensed architect, urban designer and preservationist. His designs for adapted historic structures such as the Point Fermin Lighthouse, the Cabrillo Beach Bathhouse and El Pueblo de Los Angeles Buildings and Plaza have won professional recognition. Hoyos’s interests are mainly in the areas of urban design and historic preservation with an emphasis on the training of designers for the practice. He is a former and current Commissioner on the California State Historic Resources Commission, where he served as Chair for two years. He is also a former member of the Board of Directors of the Los Angeles Conservancy and an Advisor and member of the Board of Trustees of the National Trust for Historic Preservation. Hoyos regularly collaborates on preservation projects with the National Park Service, such as the Historic American Buildings Survey Project on The Forty Acres in Delano, CA, and the American Latino Heritage Initiative Theme Study where he acted as national co-chair for the study.

Dr. Michelle Magalong
Presidential Postdoctoral fellow at the University of Maryland and President of APIAs in Historic Preservation
Michelle G. Magalong, PhD is a Presidential Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Maryland’s School of Architecture. Planning and Preservation in the Historic Preservation program. Dr. Magalong has served as President for Asian and Pacific Islander Americans in Historic Preservation, a national nonprofit organization. She received her BA in Ethnic Studies and Urban Studies and Planning at University of California, San Diego (UCSD), and MA and PhD in Urban Planning at University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA).

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